[Central Museum Ginza] Danjuro Ichikawa and Utagawa school painters

Toyohara Kunishu << Kabuki Juhachi Bannouchi Recommendation Book >> Meiji 26 (1893) © Asai collection

Kabuki is now a representative of Japan's world-class traditional culture.
An exhibition that traces the trajectory of successive Ichikawa Danjuro, who has driven the history and popularity, with ukiyo-e in the mature period will be held at Tokyo Central Museum Ginza.

At the end of the Edo era, the seventh generation of Kabuki Johachiban, which raised Kabuki to a townsman culture that Edo boasts,
Amid the repression of the Tenpo reform, Edo's most beautiful boy, Yatsushiro, supported its popularity.
In the Meiji era, the ninth generation opens up modern kabuki.
It was Ukiyo-e, which was at its height, centered on the Utagawa school, that conveyed the success of these Danjuro generations to the world.

This exhibition is directed by Tadashi Kobayashi, Gakushuin University emeritus professor and director of Okada Museum of Art, who is a leading ukiyo-e researcher, and Ryuichi Kodama studying Kabuki and other Japanese classical drama. With the Vice-Director of the Museum, the Asai Collection, collected during the Meiji period, displays over 100 precious ukiyo-e paintings with vivid colors.
The 7th, 8th, and 9th generation Ichikawa Danjuro will exhibit the history of the collaboration between the first generation Kunisada, Kuniyoshi, and Kunishu.

■ Highlights of the exhibition

Waves! Danjuro's Story Followed by Ukiyo-e

The famous archeological site of the Kabuki world, Danjuro Ichikawa
In the splendid history, there was a story of a storm.
"Kabuki 18th" established, repression by the Shogunate, sudden tragedy, Tenran Kabuki …
Kabuki has been raised to the commoner culture that captivated the hearts of Edo townspeople and to the traditional performing arts that represent Japan by successive Ichikawa Danjuro.
Why don't you relive the achievements of Danjuro Ichikawa and many of the major events that shake the kabuki world with Ukiyo-e, a media that conveyed popular customs at the time?



The charm of the splendid Asai Collection

Founded by Yusuke Asai, a businessman who worked on collecting, preserving and researching ukiyo-e prints, the Asai Collection is a collection of about 30,000 Ukiyo-e prints, mainly Utagawa schools, from the late Edo era to the early Meiji era. I own
Japanese historian Masaru Tokinoya (Professor Emeritus, Osaka University) has rated "Ukiyo-e of the late Meiji Era, the most complete personal collection in Japan".
Among them, in this exhibition, we will carefully select pictures that are full of dynamism, colorful and well preserved, and introduce many of the first publicly displayed pictures in Japan.

Touch the Kabuki of Danjuro in Ginza with history and tradition!

The venue is almost in the center of Ginza, a town where traditional culture such as long-established department stores, galleries, Kabukiza theater and Shimbashi theater are breathing.
Nobu and Kabuki actors and Shimbashi geisha have settled down since the Edo era, and in the Meiji era, when the 9th generation was active, it was transformed into a high-quality brick town where you can enjoy Western-style culture.
It is a great opportunity to experience the history of Danjuro, who is deep and brilliant in a place with such a history and culture scent.

Birth of Dawn Ichikawa Danjuro

Kabuki that began in the Edo period with Kabuki Dance , a country in Izumo.
In the early Edo period, it will be a theater style with male actors as it is now, and performances in Edo Yoza will begin.
Ichikawa Danjuro, the first generation, accelerated the popularity of Kabuki in Edo with a brave and brutal art, and the second generation developed a Naritaya art that combines storms and Japanese affairs.
After that, the relics of Ichikawa Danjuro will be handed down.
Kabuki became the subject of Ukiyo-e paintings depicting fashion customs, and the Utagawa school's leader, Utagawa Toyokuni , who flourished in the late Edo period, painted ukiyo-e paintings featuring Kabuki actors' pictures and performances. Reputation。

Sandai Utagawa Toyokuni (First Kunisada) << Danjiro Ichikawa from the first to Yatsushiro >> Temporary 12 (1841) © Asai collection

The Ripe and Exiled King 7th Generation × The Master's First Utagawa Kunisada

The only thing that made Danjuro's reputation immortal since the first one is the seventh-generation Danjuro Ichikawa, who succeeded it when he was only ten years old.
In 1932, the company established Kabuki Juhachiban in 1832, and restructured and completed the previous Narita-ya performances.
Ten years later, the Tenpo, a symbol of the Kabuki world, was expelled from Edo due to the reform of the Tempo, which banned the luxury of the common people.
On the other hand, the first Ukunagawa Kunisada (Toyokuni 3rd generation) became the first disciple of the first Utagawa Toyokuni in the mid-teens when the 7th generation named Danjuro.
Caricature is so good that it is said to be "Kunisada, a face painting", and is rated as "Beauty paintings and actor paintings are limited to Toyokuni Midai (the first Kunisada)."
There is also a work depicting the seventh generation, the king of the Edo Kabuki world of the same period.

Utagawa Toyokuni (first generation Kunisada) "Yukitsugu Oda" Kaei 3 (1850) © Asai collection

Beautiful face and tragedy handsome boy 8th generation × Kuniyoshi Utagawa

Ninth-generation Ichikawa Danjuro was the eighth-generation younger brother and was adopted on the seventh day of his birth, but returned to the Ichikawas in 1874 to invade the ninth.
By changing the traditional kabuki performances and productions, he contributed to improving the status of kabuki actors, such as performing a Tenran Kabuki in front of the Emperor Meiji in 1887.
With the ninth generation's efforts, Kabuki has been maintained in a style that can be transmitted to this day, and it can be said that it has established itself as Japan's leading traditional performing arts.
Toyohara Kunishu studied under Hasegawa school Shunobu Toyohara and learned the actor's face, and then started under Toyokuni Sandai (Kunisada of the first generation).
From around Ansei 2 (1855), the names of both teachers will be matched and signed with Toyohara Kunishu.
Kunishu's actor paintings, also known as "Kakushu of the actors" and "Sharaku of the Meiji era," excited the depressed Kabuki world.

Utagawa Kuniyoshi (estimated) "Yatsushiro Ichikawa Danrou Jigoku Hiki (tentative title, death picture)" Ansei (1854) © Asai collection

Reform and sublimation drama St. 9th generation x Kokushu Arayohara

Ninth-generation Ichikawa Danjuro was the eighth-generation younger brother and was adopted on the seventh day of his birth, but returned to the Ichikawas in 1874 to invade the ninth.
By changing the traditional kabuki performances and productions, he contributed to improving the status of kabuki actors, such as performing a Tenran Kabuki in front of the Emperor Meiji in 1887.
With the ninth generation's efforts, Kabuki has been maintained in a style that can be transmitted to this day, and it can be said that it has established itself as Japan's leading traditional performing arts.
Toyohara Kunishu studied under Hasegawa school Shunobu Toyohara and learned the actor's face, and then started under Toyokuni Sandai (Kunisada of the first generation).
From around Ansei 2 (1855), the names of both teachers will be matched and signed with Toyohara Kunishu.
Kunishu's actor paintings, also known as "Kakushu of the actors" and "Sharaku of the Meiji era," excited the depressed Kabuki world.

Toyohara Kunio “Yoshoku Raku” Meiji 20 (1887) © Asai collection

Extra humor of the artist who tells Kabuki popularity

Ukiyo-e artists who cut the customs of this world with various ideas。
Works depicting popular performances such as "Kanademoto Chushingura" also played by successive Ichikawa Danjuro, the popularity of actors expressed by kite flying and sumo wrestling, portraits of actors borrowed from animal figures Introducing unique ukiyo-e that entertained the common people of Edo.

Niigata Utagawa Kunisada 《Oku Goten Izumi Water Sightseeing Illustration》 Keio (1865) © Asai collection


● About Ichikawa Danjuro

An extremely heavy archeological site in Kabuki 伎
It lasted for more than three hundred and several decades since the first Danjuro, who began the "rough affairs" during the Genroku period of the Edo period, and counts the thirteenth generation under the name of the eleventh generation Ichikawa Ebizo.
There are many famous actors in Danjuro for generations, and they leave gorgeous footprints in the history of theater.
The second generation solidified the reputation of Danjuro and linked it to later generations.
The seventh generation is also known for organizing the various arts, such as "Sukeroku," "Shinjincho," and "Temporary (for a while)," and setting it as "Kabuki 18th."
The ninth generation opened up a new era in the Meiji era by applying various ideas and refinements to the Kabuki performances born in the Edo era, and was also regarded as a "drama sacred."
Danjuro of generations was born in Edo and worshiped Fudo Myo of Naritasan, so the name was Naritaya.
As the central entity of Edo Kabuki, it was also called "actor's deity".

● What is the Utagawa school?

A school of Ukiyo-e artists with great power from the late Edo period to the Meiji period.
In the late Edo period, it became the largest force of Ukiyo-e and influenced Van Gogh and other Western painters.
Founded in Utagawa Toyoharu, who adopted western perspectives in ukiyo-e prints, he flourished in the days of his first apprentice, Toyokuni. Kuniyoshi Utagawa of warrior painting, Hiroshige Utagawa of the first landscape painting.
In the Meiji era, Kunisada's disciples, Kuniyoshi Toyohara, and Kuniyoshi's disciples, Yoshitoki Tsukioka and Yoshiki Ochiai, were active. Many actor paintings were drawn and gained popularity, but this also had a publicity effect for playhouses and Kabuki actors, and had a relationship with the painters.

Event summary

■ Date: April 21 (Tue)-May 5 (Tue / holiday) 2020

* Open all day

■ Opening hours: 10: 00-18: 00 (last day until 16:00) * Admission until 30 minutes before closing
Venue Central Museum Ginza

〒104-0061 5F, Pulp and Paper Hall, 3-9-11 Ginza, Chuo-ku, Tokyo

* Scheduled to travel to Kyoto, Osaka, Nagoya, Fukuoka, etc.

■ Viewing fee: General 1,500 yen / High school / college student 1,000 yen (tax included)

* Free for junior high school students and younger * Free admission for those who bring a certificate of disability (including one accompanying person)

■ Organizer “Ichikawa Danjuro and Utagawa School Painters” Exhibition Executive Committee, Asahi Shimbun
■ Cooperation Shochiku Co., Ltd., 3Top Co., Ltd.
■ Exhibition website https://www.sunm.co.jp/dankuni/

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